Author Topic: Acapella Baptist ?  (Read 5516 times)

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Offline Banner

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Acapella Baptist ?
« on: Tue Oct 27, 2009 - 22:07:11 »
I'm not trying to start a discussion on instrumental music, but I'm interested in learning more about any Baptist churches that may practice acapella music. I've heard of one group, the Primitive Baptist.  I don't know much about that group, if there is anyone here a member of the Primitive Baptist I would be interested in learning more about your beliefs. There may be other groups that also sing acapella in worship. Thanks for any direction.

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Acapella Baptist ?
« on: Tue Oct 27, 2009 - 22:07:11 »

Offline janine

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #1 on: Tue Oct 27, 2009 - 22:36:11 »
Many of the Orthodox only sing a capella


Offline DCR

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #2 on: Wed Oct 28, 2009 - 07:25:40 »
I recently finished reading a book entitled Old Light on New Worship, written by John Price.

Price is a pastor of a "Reformed Baptist" church (Grace Baptist Church in Rochester, NY), which recently discarded their use of instrumental music after studying the issue from a historical and scriptural perspective.  

Offline caldwelljr11

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #3 on: Mon Nov 23, 2009 - 15:20:44 »
We do not have any where I live.  All the good singers go to the Church of Christ, the rest of us are Baptist.

Offline Snargles

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #4 on: Wed Dec 02, 2009 - 13:29:47 »
There may be other groups that also sing acapella in worship.

Most Mennonites don't use IM but some of the more liberal ones do.

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #4 on: Wed Dec 02, 2009 - 13:29:47 »



debra

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #5 on: Thu Mar 11, 2010 - 23:36:20 »
I will be honest. I was really put off when I attended a baptist church near me, bands, orchestra, wide screen, loud sound system. The congregation were not allowed to participate, and it felt like a show.

I didn't feel it was worshiping God, for me.  I felt like the congregation was nothing more than an audience.

I asked questions and was told I am required to take the really long classes to learn what their baptist doctrine, ect was, before I would be allowed to be baptized and saved. I am disabled and simply cannot attend them. I went there expecting to accept Jesus, be baptized and saved, and attend service to worship. All I got was that i was being made to join their club. I never went back, nor did they inquire as to my welfare.

The only other churches in my town are catholic. I don't mean to say negatives about catholics, just that it isn't for me and my beliefs.

I gave up.

Offline The Parson

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #6 on: Sun Mar 14, 2010 - 15:27:08 »
I will be honest. I was really put off when I attended a baptist church near me, bands, orchestra, wide screen, loud sound system. The congregation were not allowed to participate, and it felt like a show.

I didn't feel it was worshiping God, for me.  I felt like the congregation was nothing more than an audience.

I asked questions and was told I am required to take the really long classes to learn what their baptist doctrine, ect was, before I would be allowed to be baptized and saved. I am disabled and simply cannot attend them. I went there expecting to accept Jesus, be baptized and saved, and attend service to worship. All I got was that i was being made to join their club. I never went back, nor did they inquire as to my welfare.

The only other churches in my town are catholic. I don't mean to say negatives about catholics, just that it isn't for me and my beliefs.

I gave up.
You sure that was a Baptist church Debra?

debra

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #7 on: Mon Mar 15, 2010 - 17:11:28 »
Yes, it was baptist. I don't want to name the church but the name is XXX  Baptist Church.


Offline The Parson

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #8 on: Mon Mar 15, 2010 - 18:39:36 »
Debra, I believe you were at a progressive Baptist Church. I haven't seen any of them in my area but I understand they are popular up north. It's sort of of new thingey that was borrowed from the Pentecostals.

In the old Baptist churches, mostly known as Missionary Baptists, there is participation in the singing, testifying, and even in the teaching. Preaching however is usually only allowed from the occupant of the pulpit.

Here is an exert from an ebook I wrote some time back called the "Almost Forgotten Church" that may explain some of the differences:

Quote from: The Almost Forgotten Church
Baptists (Missionary Baptists)

We now want to examine the different sects of the Baptists that exist today. I tend to stay in the Americas with this particular history because the majority of Baptists are located here these days for religious freedoms sake. It is interesting to note that these sects didn't exist until certain changes started showing up in doctrine and polity.

Originally in the America's, Baptists were known just by the name. Then, in a great push in the later part of the 17th century, some of the brethren coined the name Missionary Baptists because of the many missions that were supported by the individual churches of the day.

It is interesting to note that all Baptist churches of that day were independent in their missionary efforts and their church government. It would also be safe to say that unless a congregation is independent in missions (deciding on the dispersal of missionary funds, cooperative or not), and government (constitutional & congregational) with Christ as their only head, they would not be worthy to be called Baptist. It is impossible to be a Baptist congregation by definition without being independent in these ways.

Southern Baptists (1845)

I think its is very important to mention the name used by the largest division of Baptists today. That term or name is Southern Baptist and are a culmination for the most part of those who formerly were known as Missionary Baptists. There are many who say that the creation of the Southern Baptist Convention came into being from a split over the slavery issue. I don't doubt that for a minute even though it wasn't the only reason.

Now, from most available writings and documents you will note that this term is merely a shortening of the name Southern Missionary Baptist. In originality it was never a sect but a descriptive term used to identify those Missionary Baptists located in the Southeastern United States. The term Southern Baptist has been used since the 1820's but few forgot the missionary part of this description. It wasn't until the 1920's  when the cooperative program was born that ironically the "Missionary" was dropped to give the Southern Baptist name. Go figure.

Southern Missionary Baptist Churches, for the most part are sister churches with quite a bit of diversity, i.e...... differing bible versions, progressive modernistic beliefs, old time conservative beliefs, formal, non formal, etc., who are totally autonomous but have joined together with one goal. That goal is to have reached the lost with the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

However, to call an individual church a "Southern Baptist Church" is to me a misnomer. Southern Baptist has become a denominational name yet, quite frankly, this can't be because of the diversity of the sister churches which belong to the association. Here then, is how I understand the original premise of the association:

    * An association by definition would be a group of sister (like minded) churches, who are totally autonomous, with Christ as their only head, joining together for a common goal, (missions) where the association itself answers directly to the majority of the votes from its associates. The autonomy would then remain in the hands of the individual congregations who choose to associate in such a way and dictate to the association by majority vote. Therefore, not a denomination but an association.
          o If the Southern Baptist Convention were a "denomination", the administration of that association would then need to be a totally autonomous group dictating to the churches themselves. This would make them no different from the protestant congregations which operate under counsels and synods. As I pointed out earlier, WE ARE NOT PROTESTANT. I hope it never comes to that but I fear it soon will. Some local associations have already claimed autonomy from their member churches.

Sovereign Grace Baptists (1850's)

Their first appearance was connected to the acceptance of a protestant teaching called Calvinism in some of the churches. This was the most destructive doctrine ever known to the Missionary minded Baptist churches in the America's. Mind you, this same problem arose in our sister churches in Europe before the beginning of the 19th century. In short and to simplify, Calvinism in some of the Baptist churches became known as the Sovereign Grace Teachings. There were some that maintained that God will only choose a certain number to be saved. Anyone not chosen by God to be saved were just out of the Grace loop of God.

Heated debates over this teaching split the Southern Baptist Convention asunder to form the American Baptist Association in the early 1900's. Not trying to rekindle an old argument but, didn't Jesus say: John 3:14 And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up: 3:15 That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life. 3:16 For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. 3:17 For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. 3:18 He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.

Self named Landmarkers, these brethren are also avid church historians. Some have called them "Trail of Blood brethren" after the popular lectures by J.M. Carroll in the 1920's. This issue, loving history myself, is one of the few things I have in common with these brethren. All too many times we have forgotten that Foxes Book of Martyrs is full of our early brethren being the main target at Catholic heretic hunts. When the president of the Counsel of Trent, Cardinal Stanislaus Hosius, noted in the 1540's that we had "been grievously tormented and cut off with the knife during the past twelve hundred years", he wasn't just whistling Dixie folks...    

Many of the Sovereign Grace (Landmark) churches are part of the American Baptists Association or independent, same as the Missionary Baptists.    

Fundamental Baptists (1920's)

The second major change took place in the late 1920's with the fundamentalist movement. Names like Amzi C. Dixon in the southern U.S. and William B. Riley in the north were preaching against liberal ideals that had crept into the various Baptist associations and advocated a separatist view not dissimilar to the Mennonite movement of the 1520's. Their main thrust was the tenuous focus on a branch of eschatology known as Premillennialism and a doctrine called Dispensationalism introduced by Clarence Larkin & Cyrus Ingerson Scofield. There is further evidence of an earlier study of the Pre-Tribulational doctrine dated 1742-44 (.)    

The church government in many of the Fundamentalist churches are a bit different as opposed to the original in that pastoral authority is stressed to a major degree.  This means that the actual practice is done with variations or combinations of pastoral, deacon, and congregational input, and decision- making.  Some of them are basically totalitarian in form, with the pastor making the majority of the decisions - in every area of the church ministry; other pastors want some input from the deacons before decisions are made - and they will still make all, or most, of the final decisions; and, there are many also, that are much more truly congregational in that the Church Body makes many decisions through voting.  These variations will often change from pastor to pastor, depending primarily on what they were used to, or were taught, and the different schools they attended, or through the pastors that may have trained them.  

The Separated Brethren (1960's)

Fundamentalism had already established itself in the Southern U.S. by the 1960's and there was defiantly at this time an unrest among the southern missionary Baptist churches over some of the transactions/investments made by the Southern Baptist Convention which were questionable. Monies are reported to have been invested in tenement/slum properties in major cities in the U.S. Also the issue of the newest Bible version, the NIV were in hot debate.

Instead of remaining in what was starting to look like a liberal organization, these churches removed themselves from the cooperative program and started to embrace the Fundamentalist views and teachings. Yet, in church organization/government (constitutional) and style of worship these brethren are almost indistinguishable from their Missionary Baptist sister churches today.
« Last Edit: Mon Mar 15, 2010 - 18:48:02 by The Parson »

debra

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Re: Acapella Baptist ?
« Reply #9 on: Mon Mar 15, 2010 - 20:08:35 »
Thank you for posting that. The church here definitely is southern baptist and is a part of the southern baptist convention. Is that what it is called? i am new to all this.

I have researched all the various churches/denominations in my small town, but I keep being drawn back to this baptist church. So many are praying for me, and I do believe this is where God is leading me.

I plan to start attending after Easter. The bands and such seemed so much like a Vegas show to me. But from my research, pretty much all the protestant churches in my area do that.  I think it is just a matter of "moving with the times".

I know that God is leading me. I wanted to just stop, forget it, but so many are praying for me, and I feel it. I told them to stop it.  ::blushing::

But, they did not stop, and God is not letting me go. I am a true beginner at all this, but God is not letting me go.