Author Topic: When did Baptist come to be?  (Read 39074 times)

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Offline Bon Voyage

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #70 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:22:06 »
btw, I could have sworn this thread--and board--was about Baptist theology and history, not Catholic.  I realize that you guys are much more important, but give the Baptists a little space, please and don't make everything about you.

Baptist history is post-Luther, as said long ago.

Christ founded a church in c. 30 AD, and because He declared His church would stand until His return, His church will have a visible history all the way back to then.

Um no, Christ did found a church, it is the Baptist church, and the Catholics separated from it with corruption and paganism at the time of Constantine's reign.

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #70 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:22:06 »

marc

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #71 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:22:25 »
Ol' Jake, Some people resist education to the point that an attempt is a waste.  Building straw men is a worthless hobby.  


::alien::

In answer to the rest of your post, So What?  Perhaps you could be less relevant, but I'm not sure how without delving into pre-Columbian archeology.

Offline ole Jake

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #72 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:23:33 »
And Tantor, you've posted long enough to know that only one person's view of scripture is infallible. 

Gary.

::lookaround::

That's only because I agree with God.  If you disagree with me, you disagree with God.  And that's the bottom line because God's Word says so.

I hope you know that you have just made the case Luther made about himself, though he phrased it that because scripture is perspicuous, and because the Elect will be lead by the Holy Spirit to read scripture correctly, those who were Elect would interpret scripture to see sola fide and - surprise, surprise - everything else the way Luther did.

That is why Luther declared Calvin and Zwingli heretics - they differed from Luther.

Of course, you cannot allow yourself to see what this means about the inevitable fruits of sola scriptura.

marc

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #73 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:25:17 »
btw, Jake, as far as not following from the start, perhaps you might look over the thread again.  You seem to have wandered into the wrong one.

This thread isn't about Catholicism.  Please stop making everything about You.

Offline Bon Voyage

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #74 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:27:28 »
And Tantor, you've posted long enough to know that only one person's view of scripture is infallible. 

Gary.

::lookaround::

That's only because I agree with God.  If you disagree with me, you disagree with God.  And that's the bottom line because God's Word says so.

I hope you know that you have just made the case Luther made about himself, though he phrased it that because scripture is perspicuous, and because the Elect will be lead by the Holy Spirit to read scripture correctly, those who were Elect would interpret scripture to see sola fide and - surprise, surprise - everything else the way Luther did.

That is why Luther declared Calvin and Zwingli heretics - they differed from Luther.

Of course, you cannot allow yourself to see what this means about the inevitable fruits of sola scriptura.

Talk about making a mountain of a molehill and faulty logic to boot.  There is no private interpretation, I only hold to the faith delivered to the saints.  You want me to believe that the faith was delivered to the saints in tiny morsels.  It was delivered once.  I only agree with God's Word.

You can agree with Pope Alexander VI all you want.

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #74 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:27:28 »



Offline ole Jake

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #75 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:27:55 »
Ol' Jake, Some people resist education to the point that an attempt is a waste.  Building straw men is a worthless hobby.  


::alien::

In answer to the rest of your post, So What?  Perhaps you could be less relevant, but I'm not sure how without delving into pre-Columbian archeology.

Like the straw man you have of Catholicism? How hard do you resist seeing the chaos of tens of thousands of Protestant denominations which have been inevitable due to sola fide and sola scriptura?

marc

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #76 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:28:35 »
I agree with Alexander Pope.  You know, the part about a little knowledge being a dangerous thing, drinking deep and all that?

marc

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #77 on: Fri Jan 09, 2009 - 20:29:52 »
Ol' Jake, Some people resist education to the point that an attempt is a waste.  Building straw men is a worthless hobby.  


::alien::

In answer to the rest of your post, So What?  Perhaps you could be less relevant, but I'm not sure how without delving into pre-Columbian archeology.

Like the straw man you have of Catholicism? How hard do you resist seeing the chaos of tens of thousands of Protestant denominations which have been inevitable due to sola fide and sola scriptura?

You're going to have to quote the posts where I talked about all that.  I think it happened during my last alien abduction, so I don't remember.

Why are you posting so off-topic on this thread? 

Offline Lee Freeman

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #78 on: Sat Jan 10, 2009 - 22:12:04 »
To get back to the original topic, and Bill's original question, the Baptist Church emerged at the turn of  the 17th century from English Puritanism. One of its early leaders was John Smyth (1570-1612), who vowed not to rest until he had reduced "the worship and ministry of the Church to the primitive Apostolic institution from which as yet it is so far distant."

Pax.

marc

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #79 on: Sat Jan 10, 2009 - 22:16:12 »
Thank you.  Let's keep it on topic now.  I'm tired and grouchy.

Offline Lee Freeman

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #80 on: Sat Jan 10, 2009 - 23:06:45 »
Yeah it seems like everything here nowadays turns into an argument of Protestants against Catholics.

Pax.

Offline Jimbob

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #81 on: Mon Jan 12, 2009 - 07:32:25 »
Um, vice-versa in this case.

Offline Jimbob

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #82 on: Mon Jan 12, 2009 - 07:33:06 »
To get back to the original topic, and Bill's original question, the Baptist Church emerged at the turn of  the 17th century from English Puritanism. One of its early leaders was John Smyth (1570-1612), who vowed not to rest until he had reduced "the worship and ministry of the Church to the primitive Apostolic institution from which as yet it is so far distant."

Pax.
And doesn't that sound familiar to the RMer's ear?

Offline Jimbob

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #83 on: Wed Jan 14, 2009 - 14:25:30 »
::detective::

Hey Gary, something struck me today.  The Baptists were used by God in the same way is John the Baptist.  To prepare the way of the Lord.  That's why Campbell was a Baptist before he started the RM, that was the preparation before The Real ThingTM.

::laughinghisterically::

Offline Bon Voyage

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #84 on: Wed Jan 14, 2009 - 22:02:29 »
::detective::

Hey Gary, something struck me today.  The Baptists were used by God in the same way is John the Baptist.  To prepare the way of the Lord.  That's why Campbell was a Baptist before he started the RM, that was the preparation before The Real ThingTM.

::laughinghisterically::

That is darn tootin'.  THE BIBLE CHURCH!

Offline Wycliffes_Shillelagh

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #85 on: Thu Jan 15, 2009 - 13:37:58 »
 Perhaps you could be less relevant, but I'm not sure how without delving into pre-Columbian archeology.
Now there's a topic I can get down with!

And Tantor, you've posted long enough to know that only one person's view of scripture is infallible. 

Gary.

::lookaround::
rofl  rofl  rofl

Abraham

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #86 on: Mon Jan 19, 2009 - 10:51:33 »
       A Baptist is simply one who believes in Christ and the core truths of the Bible!
The Baptist started with Adam,they were first called Baptist when john came on the scene.
This is a group of true believers who are not related to the "Mother"

Offline Bonnie

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #87 on: Thu Jan 22, 2009 - 17:49:27 »
Even earlier.  It was founded by John the Baptist around 26 AD.

 ::takingphoto::

I always assumed he was called the Baptist because of all the baptisms he did. However, we could say he was the first Baptist.

J.M. Carroll, born January 8, 1858 and died January 10, 1931, wrote a short book titled The Trail of Blood. It is about the origin of Baptists. I have no idea how accurate it is, but you can find it online and print it out as I did; it's only 46 pages. I've seen and once had a copy of it--so I know it's still printed. You might be able to find or order a copy in a Christian store. Carroll was more than 70-years-old when he wrote it and must have died shortly after writing it since he was 73 when he died.

In the book, there is a quote from Sir Isaac Newton: "The Baptists are the only known body of Christians that have never symbolized with Rome." That means that Baptists were never a part of the Roman Catholic Church and formed completely separate from that religion. That is why I refuse to call myself a "Protestant", which refers to those religions (all except Baptist) who were once a part of the RCC and left and formed a new religion.

I just printed it today and haven't had time to read but I will. I have no idea if he gives the actual date of when Baptists began, but it's something I would like to know.



I read some of The Trail of Blood. It was very interesting.

Offline Lee Freeman

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #88 on: Thu Jan 29, 2009 - 22:08:29 »
Early on Campbell's Disciples were often referred to as "Reforming Baptists."

Anticipating a union in 1866 between the Disciples and the Baptists of Eastern Virginia, Robert Richardson said of the Baptists:

Upon visiting, yesterday, our beloved Brother Campbell, now feeble in health and advanced in years, and mentioning the proposed union to him, he expressed himself greatly delighted with it, and earnestly in favor of consumating it upon a true scriptural basis. He said it would indeed be a great achievement if all baptized believers could be united in one communion, and would work wonders in regard to the spread of the truth and the conversion of the world.

Upon the principles which we, as a people, have always professed, there can certainly be no valid objection to union with our Baptist brethren, if they do not require anything from us for which there cannot be produced a clear Scriptural warrant. The Baptists have ever been earnest advocates for civil and religious liberty; for the independence of churches; and for a rigid adherence to the teachings and institutions of the New Testament. They have been conspicuous at all times for their devotion to the word of God, and their willingness to endure afflictions and persecutions for the name of the Lord Jesus. Ecclesiastically and formally connected with them as we were in the beginning, we have never been wholly separated from them; for, in spite of misunderstandings and the efforts of a few to create differences, there have constantly been more or less intercommunion and fraternal intercourse. At no time have we separated ourselves, or denied fellowship to a Baptist brother, or refused to receive as a member any one accredited by letter from a Baptist church. We have, in reality, ever claimed the Baptists as our brethren. We have never admitted that there was any just cause of division between us, and have constantly cherished the hope that a little time would terminate all unprofitable controversies, and sweeten the acerbity of feeling produced in certain cases by the speculative polemics of a too earnest opinionism. . . .

There has been indeed, amongst us, since this movement commenced, some progress in the knowledge of the Sacred Record; a better understanding of the nature and the design of the institutions of the gospel; a nearer approach to the simplicity of the faith of primitive ages; and in these respects, it might, at first view, be supposed that the differances between us and the Baptists have been widened. But it is to be remembered that the Baptists themselves have participated in this progress; that many of the important points for which we have contended, have been advocated likewise by the most eminent men among them; and that there has been, upon the whole, a gradual approximation to an entire agreement in respect to everything essential to Christian union.

Pax.




Offline Bon Voyage

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #89 on: Sat Jan 31, 2009 - 10:13:21 »
29 AD at Pentecost.

Offline kensington

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #90 on: Sat Jan 31, 2009 - 12:31:02 »

Online Jaime

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #91 on: Sat Jan 31, 2009 - 12:38:41 »
29 AD at Pentecost.

Indeed.

Had to have been earlier. John was already a Baptist before then just prior to Christ's baptism. ie, John the Baptist. It's in black and white.

Offline Bon Voyage

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #92 on: Thu Jun 18, 2009 - 15:28:53 »
29 AD at Pentecost.

Indeed.

Had to have been earlier. John was already a Baptist before then just prior to Christ's baptism. ie, John the Baptist. It's in black and white.

It was definitely at Pentecost.  Those 33 A.D. RM'ers missed the boat by four years.

Offline verywellsaid

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #93 on: Thu Aug 06, 2009 - 10:31:08 »
BAPTIST DISTINCTIVES



Historically, Baptists find their origins in the Free (Anabaptist) Churches. These churches existed from the time of the apostles. Even though the name BAPTIST was not used until the 1600's, the Baptist Distinctives were practiced by small, persecuted groups during the Dark Ages and the Reformation. Biblical faith and practice forced these to separate from two powerful traditional groups. The Roman Catholic Church - This group eventually rejected all of the Baptist Distinctives. When their persecution ended, they became the persecutors. The Protestant Churches - During the Protestant Reformation, these formerly Catholic churches tried to return to a more Biblical pattern. They still rejected most of the Baptist Distinctives. To a lesser degree, they also persecuted the Anabaptists. Thus, Bible-centered Baptist Churches are not Protestant churches. They existed long before the Reformation.
THE HISTORIC BAPTIST DISTINCTIVES
Even though the name BAPTIST has been misused by many, we retain the name because the historic Baptist position best describes our position in matters of doctrine, faith, and practice. We share similar positions with other groups who base their beliefs completely on Bible teaching. Even though they may not choose our name, they are fellow workers. For the sake of memory, we have arranged the major Baptist Distinctives in an acrostic.
B - The BIBLE is our final authority for what we believe and what we do.
No insight, testimony, or decree of man, regardless of his piety or position, can ever supersede the Bible (II Timothy 3:16,17). This distinctive is the primary Baptist distinctive. All others spring from this absolute trust in the scriptures.
A - The AUTONOMY of the Local Church.
The local church is an independent body accountable to no one but our Lord. There is no person or organization on earth that can dictate what a local church can or should do (Acts 15; Matthew 18:15-17). This does not prevent voluntary cooperation with other churches as long as such activity does not violate the church's independence or affiliate the church with satanic apostasy.
P- The PRIESTHOOD of the Believer.
Every believer today is a priest and may enter the presence of God directly through only one Mediator, our Great High Priest, Jesus Christ. There is no other human mediator (Hebrews 4:14-16; I Peter 2:5-10). Along with the privilege of priesthood, there is the responsibility as priests to live a life separated from sin and unto God.
T - There are TWO Ordinances: Baptism and the Lord's Supper (Acts 2:41,42).
An ordinance is . . .
1. A command of Christ
2. A picture of saving truth
3. Explained in the New Testament
4. Practiced by the New Testament churches
We practice only believer's baptism by immersion. This contradicts two practices common among Roman Catholic and Protestant churches: infant baptism and sprinkling (pouring). Immersion is the only acceptable mode for baptism because it alone preserves the picture of saving truth. No other form pictures the death, burial, and resurrection of Christ (Romans 6:1-5). We believe that communion (the Lord's Supper) is a symbolic ordinance, picturing Christ's body broken for our sins and His blood shed for our redemption. It is not a saving ordinance, but helps us remember His death, and inspires us while looking forward to His coming, 1 Corinthians 11:23-24. It is to be observed by regenerate, obedient believers.
I - The INDIVIDUAL'S Soul Liberty.
We believe that every individual has the liberty to believe, right or wrong, as his own conscience dictates. While we seek to persuade men to choose the right, a person must not be forced to into compliance (Romans 14:5-12).
S - The membership is made exclusively of SAVED and baptized individuals.
Membership is strictly a matter of obedience; it bestows no grace (Acts 2:41-47).
T - There are only TWO offices which guide the church: the Pastor and the Deacons.
There is no additional hierarchy of offices (I Timothy 3:1-13).
S - The SEPARATION of Church and State.
The church and state are two separate authorities ordained by God. One should not attempt to control the other (Acts 4:29; Romans 12:18;13:1-5; I Timothy 2:1-4; I Corinthians 5:9-13)

That's why for sure, im secured that "Baptist" is the true Church of Christ. for more info. please visit: thetrailofblood.com ::reading::

Offline BroBrent

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #94 on: Sun Dec 20, 2009 - 00:29:59 »
Baptist are not protestants. We were never a part of the catholic Church. The Catholics serve a dying Christ sic the catholic crucifix while we serve a dead but living Christ the empty cross. We have a finished work where as the catholics have a continuing work by the pope.

Stucky

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #95 on: Sun Dec 20, 2009 - 02:26:30 »
Baptist are not protestants. We were never a part of the catholic Church. The Catholics serve a dying Christ sic the catholic crucifix while we serve a dead but living Christ the empty cross. We have a finished work where as the catholics have a continuing work by the pope.

Now, now, BroBrent,

I have to take issue with you over the "dying Christ".  I have heard that said by Baptists for years and it is not a fair statement and is only said because of the crucifix.  Catholics believe that Jesus died and rose again after three days and lives seated at the right hand of God, The Father, in Heaven and that He will return to rule the world one day.

I would suggest you google the Catholic Catechism (sp?) and/or the Apostle's Creed.  I think it may also be in the Nicene Creed also.  I think (IMHO) that the crucifix was made to show Christ suffering on the cross because the Catholic church, much as the Jewish faith, used guilt in the old days as a tool to keep the faithful in line.

Offline BroBrent

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #96 on: Sun Dec 20, 2009 - 10:12:08 »
In checking out the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), The Catholic Encyclopedia, and The Council of Trent, we find the following:  The Eucharist is referred to in several ways.

As a sacrifice
"the holy sacrifice of the Eucharist," (CCC, 1055) and "the Eucharist is also a sacrifice," (CCC, 1365).
As a divine sacrifice
"For it is in the liturgy, especially in the divine sacrifice of the Eucharist, that "the work of our redemption is accomplished," (CCC, 1068).
As a representation of the sacrifice of Christ
"The Eucharist is thus a sacrifice because it re-presents (makes present) the sacrifice of the cross," (CCC, 1366).
Is 'one single sacrifice' with Christ's sacrifice
"The sacrifice of Christ and the sacrifice of the Eucharist are one single sacrifice," (CCC, 1367).
It is the same sacrifice of Christ
"And since in this divine sacrifice which is celebrated in the Mass, the same Christ who offered himself once in a bloody manner on the altar of the cross is contained and is offered in an unbloody manner," (CCC, 1367).
It is propitiatory (removes the wrath of God)
"...this sacrifice is truly propitiatory," (CCC, 1367).
To all who deny its propitiatory nature Trent pronounces anathema
"If any one saith, that the sacrifice of the mass is only a sacrifice of praise and of thanksgiving; or, that it is a bare commemoration of the sacrifice consummated on the cross, but not a propitiatory sacrifice; or, that it profits him only who receives; and that it ought not to be offered for the living and the dead for sins, pains, satisfactions, and other necessities; let him be anathema." (Trent: On the Sacrifice of the Mass: Canon 3);
It is called the sacrifice of Christ which is offered via the priest's hands
"The sacrifice of Christ the only Mediator, which in the Eucharist is offered through the priests' hands," (CCC, 1369).
It is capable of making reparation of sins
"As sacrifice, the Eucharist is also offered in reparation for the sins of the living and the dead," (CCC, 1414).
It is to be considered a true and proper sacrifice
"The Church intends the Mass to be regarded as a 'true and proper sacrifice'", (The Catholic Encyclopedia, topic: "Sacrifice of the Mass").

Stucky

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #97 on: Tue Dec 22, 2009 - 01:53:11 »
In checking out the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), The Catholic Encyclopedia, and The Council of Trent, we find the following:  The Eucharist is referred to in several ways.

As a sacrifice
"the holy sacrifice of the Eucharist," (CCC, 1055) and "the Eucharist is also a sacrifice," (CCC, 1365).
As a divine sacrifice
"For it is in the liturgy, especially in the divine sacrifice of the Eucharist, that "the work of our redemption is accomplished," (CCC, 1068).
As a representation of the sacrifice of Christ
"The Eucharist is thus a sacrifice because it re-presents (makes present) the sacrifice of the cross," (CCC, 1366).
Is 'one single sacrifice' with Christ's sacrifice
"The sacrifice of Christ and the sacrifice of the Eucharist are one single sacrifice," (CCC, 1367).
It is the same sacrifice of Christ
"And since in this divine sacrifice which is celebrated in the Mass, the same Christ who offered himself once in a bloody manner on the altar of the cross is contained and is offered in an unbloody manner," (CCC, 1367).
It is propitiatory (removes the wrath of God)
"...this sacrifice is truly propitiatory," (CCC, 1367).
To all who deny its propitiatory nature Trent pronounces anathema
"If any one saith, that the sacrifice of the mass is only a sacrifice of praise and of thanksgiving; or, that it is a bare commemoration of the sacrifice consummated on the cross, but not a propitiatory sacrifice; or, that it profits him only who receives; and that it ought not to be offered for the living and the dead for sins, pains, satisfactions, and other necessities; let him be anathema." (Trent: On the Sacrifice of the Mass: Canon 3);
It is called the sacrifice of Christ which is offered via the priest's hands
"The sacrifice of Christ the only Mediator, which in the Eucharist is offered through the priests' hands," (CCC, 1369).
It is capable of making reparation of sins
"As sacrifice, the Eucharist is also offered in reparation for the sins of the living and the dead," (CCC, 1414).
It is to be considered a true and proper sacrifice
"The Church intends the Mass to be regarded as a 'true and proper sacrifice'", (The Catholic Encyclopedia, topic: "Sacrifice of the Mass").


Wow Brent, you didn't have to beat me up with all that. ::smile::  I understand (sorta) what they mean there but I don't see anything said about the constant crucifixion of Jesus.  You called it "a dying Christ" but I think you meant the constant crucifying of Christ.

Offline BroBrent

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #98 on: Fri Dec 25, 2009 - 18:49:10 »
Terminology is different , but it remains. the sacraments represent the continual sacrifice of the Lord.

Heb 10:14 For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.

Stucky

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #99 on: Sat Dec 26, 2009 - 06:01:59 »
Terminology is different , but it remains. the sacraments represent the continual sacrifice of the Lord.

Heb 10:14 For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.

lol  Usually I get fed up with the overly long answers on here.  This time it was too short.  Explain how the sacrements represent the "continual sacrifice" of the Lord?

Offline BroBrent

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #100 on: Mon Dec 28, 2009 - 13:00:42 »
Though not a Catholic, I believe that they believe that the communion wafer they take is the actual body of Christ and the wine is the actual blood of Christ. This means that the sacrifice is the continual.

The Eucharist is thus a sacrifice because it re-presents (makes present) the sacrifice of the cross," (CCC, 1366).

For it is in the liturgy, especially in the divine sacrifice of the Eucharist, that "the work of our redemption is accomplished," (CCC, 1068).


The sacrifice of Christ and the sacrifice of the Eucharist are one single sacrifice," (CCC, 1367).

A continuing sacrifice every time they take communion. Therefore I said that they worship a dieing Christ instead of a risen Christ.



Offline The Parson

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #101 on: Sun Mar 14, 2010 - 15:29:25 »
I need to start reading this thread from the beginning. Interesting.

Offline The Parson

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #102 on: Sun Mar 14, 2010 - 15:46:39 »
I'm still not completely through the thread but skimmed enough to see a certain aspect wasn't touched on.

The Baptists, who've gone by the names of Petro-Brussians, Arnoldists, Henricians, Albigenses, and Waldenses and had the earlier name of anabaptists didn't really come from John the Baptist or even at the time of Pentecost. Their beginings were at Antioch, Ephesus, Tyre, Rome, Smyrna, Pergamos, Thyatira, Sardis, Lystria, Philadelphia, and Laodicea to name a few places, with the evangelism of the apostle Paul. We were even given the name of Paulitians because of this. They were and are the Gentile church planted by the missionaries from Jerusalem.

Want me to continue on?

blituri

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #103 on: Sun Mar 14, 2010 - 16:16:34 »
John Smyth called his Group the Church of Christ.

Actually the church of Christ was ordained in the wilderness: the Hebrew word is Qahal or the common word for synagogue.  Stephen equated it to the ekklesia. Because Christ was the ROCK and the source of living waters I would say that it was the Church of Christ.

It was inclusive of Rest, reading and rehearsing the Word (only) of God (only)
It was exclusive of vocal or instrumental rejoicing.

To that Jesus ordained the Lord's Supper which is another teaching activity.

If a group does more than that it is not a Church or ekklesia of Christ.

I don't think you can find one.

Offline pointmade

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Re: When did Baptist come to be?
« Reply #104 on: Mon Mar 15, 2010 - 21:55:06 »
The beginning of the Baptist Church. In 1607 a separatist congregation in Gainsborough migrated to Holland to escape persecution. There they came under the influence of the Mennonites and their Anabaptist ideas. (Their leader became a convert to the Mennonites and was excommunicated by the main body.) The congregation adopted some Anabaptist ideas without becoming Mennonites. They began to re-baptize be livers, rejecting infant baptism, by pouring (not by immersion).  They adopted Arminian view of theology which they also found in Holland. In 1611-12, Thomas Helwys led a small group of them back to England to where they founded the first Baptist congregation on English soil. Since they adopted Arminian views, they became known as "General Baptists." This is the beginning of the Baptist Church as a distinct organized denomination.

Another separatist congregation, including among its leadership Brewster, Bradford, and Robinson, to become famous Pilgrim Fathers, in New England, also migrated to Holland. In 1616 a portion of this congregation returned to England. In 1620, another portion sailed to New England and established the Plymouth Colony. This was the beginning of the Congregational Church in America. In 1638, a group split from the Congregational Church in England and formed a Baptist Church. They, however, retained their Calvinistic theology, and came to be known as "Particular Baptists." In 1604-41 immersion became the mode of baptism among Baptists.

In 1689 a Bill of Rights put an end to the attempt to force dissenters (from Puritanism) to worship according to the "Book of Common Prayer." This act declared that no Roman Catholic may ever wear the crown of England (as did James II). As a result of this new freedom, four dissenting groups formally leave the Church of England and form separate denominations: The Presbyterians; The congregationalists; The Baptists; The Quakers