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Author Topic: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences  (Read 758 times)

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Offline epiphanius

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Catholic blogger David Mills was once a senior editor of Touchstone magazine, and remains friends with the people he knew from that organization.

I think the attitude he shows in this article https://stream.org/russell-moore-pope-good-moore/ is a model of Christian charity and an excellent example of the kind of mutual respect I would like to see more of on this forum. ::amen!::

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Offline chosenone

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #1 on: Tue Sep 08, 2015 - 13:15:50 »
The thing is that abortion is forgiven by God though Jesus anyway, and doesnt need a priest or Bishop to have anything to do with it, and that is sadly one of the vast differences between what many believe from the Bibles teaching, and what the RC church thinks.

I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever, I have been to churches of several different denominations and dont belong to a particular one myself,  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isnt, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity. I respect people for who they are, but I can never respect a religion that leads so may into such error. 

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #1 on: Tue Sep 08, 2015 - 13:15:50 »

Offline RB

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #2 on: Tue Sep 08, 2015 - 16:45:26 »
The thing is that abortion is forgiven by God though Jesus anyway, and doesnt need a priest or Bishop to have anything to do with it, and that is sadly one of the vast differences between what many believe from the Bibles teaching, and what the RC church thinks.

I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever, I have been to churches of several different denominations and dont belong to a particular one myself,  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isnt, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity. I respect people for who they are, but I can never respect a religion that leads so may into such error.

I love my sister Judy, even though she thinks her brother is a little nuts at times.  Now that's Christians charity is it not.  ::kissing:: A kiss of charity to a dear sister.

Offline mclees8

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #3 on: Tue Sep 08, 2015 - 17:17:19 »
Catholic blogger David Mills was once a senior editor of Touchstone magazine, and remains friends with the people he knew from that organization.

I think the attitude he shows in this article https://stream.org/russell-moore-pope-good-moore/ is a model of Christian charity and an excellent example of the kind of mutual respect I would like to see more of on this forum. ::amen!::

The problem is not finding common ground on issues so we can be civil with one another. Jesus said be gentle as lambs, but wise as serpents.  The church is not about catholic verses Protestant. I think Chosen and I are close on that.  It is names that we give ourselves that divide.  We must not see conflict while we are both in the valley, but leaving all confusion and climb up on the mountain where Jesus shows us all the confusion below, about who's church and doctrine is more right than another, and false concepts who is the original church. 

Here is the looming problem that shadows Christianity.  Worldly compromise and looking to politics and saying we are followers of Christ, and that Christ gives authority to the church to mingle in the politics of the present age. Freedom and dreams of peace and posterity by means of religious and political efforts. Do we not believe the word of God when it plainly shows us in REV 17 and 18 that the whore walks hand an hand with Babylon which is a fallen state of men. The call is to come out or be judged with her. This is the cry of God to see the real problem and leave it.
« Last Edit: Tue Sep 08, 2015 - 17:20:44 by mclees8 »

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #3 on: Tue Sep 08, 2015 - 17:17:19 »

Offline epiphanius

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #4 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 10:55:09 »
I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever [...]  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isn't, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity.

Admittedly, some things taught by the Catholic Church go beyond the obvious meaning of any one scriptural text, but formal forgiveness of sins is spelled out quite explicitly in John 20:

Quote
"Jesus therefore said to them again, 'Peace be to you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.'  When he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, 'Receive the Holy Spirit!  Whoever's sins you forgive, they are forgiven them. Whoever's sins you retain, they have been retained.'" (John 20:21-23)

It is clear enough that someone could take this as more than simply an exhortation to forgiveness, even though others might take it as nothing more than that.

In the article I linked, David Mills is extending that kind of latitude to his friend in Christ, Russell Moore, who says exactly what you say about the authority to forgive sins.  He affirms: "I respect him for asserting something he believes fundamental.  The practice of confession really does point to very deep and pastorally important differences between Catholics and Protestants."  That's what I'm talking about. 


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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #4 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 10:55:09 »



Offline chosenone

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #5 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 11:15:42 »
I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever [...]  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isn't, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity.

Admittedly, some things taught by the Catholic Church go beyond the obvious meaning of any one scriptural text, but formal forgiveness of sins is spelled out quite explicitly in John 20:

Quote
"Jesus therefore said to them again, 'Peace be to you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.'  When he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, 'Receive the Holy Spirit!  Whoever's sins you forgive, they are forgiven them. Whoever's sins you retain, they have been retained.'" (John 20:21-23)

It is clear enough that someone could take this as more than simply an exhortation to forgiveness, even though others might take it as nothing more than that.

In the article I linked, David Mills is extending that kind of latitude to his friend in Christ, Russell Moore, who says exactly what you say about the authority to forgive sins.  He affirms: "I respect him for asserting something he believes fundamental.  The practice of confession really does point to very deep and pastorally important differences between Catholics and Protestants."  That's what I'm talking about.

No where does God says that certain sins can only be forgiven by a priest/bishop/elder.A lady who had had an abortion and is repentant, can come to God through Jesus, she has no need to have to crawl to a Bishop and tell him what she has done.

I cant respect a religion that has so many deep errors and that leads so many the wrong way. I feel sorry for those caught up in it and I pray they will come out, and I can treat them with respect as people, but I cant respect their wrong beliefs and practises.   

Offline mclees8

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #6 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 14:21:07 »
I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever [...]  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isn't, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity.

Admittedly, some things taught by the Catholic Church go beyond the obvious meaning of any one scriptural text, but formal forgiveness of sins is spelled out quite explicitly in John 20:

Quote
"Jesus therefore said to them again, 'Peace be to you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.'  When he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, 'Receive the Holy Spirit!  Whoever's sins you forgive, they are forgiven them. Whoever's sins you retain, they have been retained.'" (John 20:21-23)

It is clear enough that someone could take this as more than simply an exhortation to forgiveness, even though others might take it as nothing more than that.

In the article I linked, David Mills is extending that kind of latitude to his friend in Christ, Russell Moore, who says exactly what you say about the authority to forgive sins.  He affirms: "I respect him for asserting something he believes fundamental.  The practice of confession really does point to very deep and pastorally important differences between Catholics and Protestants."  That's what I'm talking about.

In your belief is one forgiven only when they confess to a priest of the RCC.

I know one who has a very close relationship with our Lord who has repented of sin not by confession to a priest but a genuine confession of heart and never did that sin again thirty five years

Who has been forgiven? the one who confessed to the a Catholic priest
The one who confessed to Christ or both?


Offline Ladonia

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #7 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 14:56:42 »
The thing is that abortion is forgiven by God though Jesus anyway, and doesnt need a priest or Bishop to have anything to do with it, and that is sadly one of the vast differences between what many believe from the Bibles teaching, and what the RC church thinks.

I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever, I have been to churches of several different denominations and dont belong to a particular one myself,  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isnt, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity. I respect people for who they are, but I can never respect a religion that leads so may into such error.

And as I've said before, all you have is your new interpretation of the Scriptures that was also thought up by men, rejecting what had been taught about Christianity for hundreds upon hundreds upon hundreds of years. So which new Scriptural interpretation that came about by men is correct? Is it the one that you have come up with by yourself, or perhaps it's the JW's, or the Mormons, or any one of the thousands of Christian sects out there?

« Last Edit: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 15:05:59 by Ladonia »

Offline Ladonia

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #8 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 15:04:03 »
This is a beautiful idea that you put forth here in this thread, but as evidenced by many of those who come here to the Catholic section it is an impossibility. It is clear they are not here to learn or have genuine Christian fellowship, but to constantly belittle, accuse, berate, and every other negative connotation of the Catholic faith tradition that can be thought of. No, you will never see any mutual respect on this forum towards Catholics by most of the other members of the other Christian traditions who come here.
« Last Edit: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 15:20:59 by Ladonia »

Offline Ladonia

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #9 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 15:27:00 »
I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever [...]  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isn't, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity.

Admittedly, some things taught by the Catholic Church go beyond the obvious meaning of any one scriptural text, but formal forgiveness of sins is spelled out quite explicitly in John 20:

Quote
"Jesus therefore said to them again, 'Peace be to you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.'  When he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, 'Receive the Holy Spirit!  Whoever's sins you forgive, they are forgiven them. Whoever's sins you retain, they have been retained.'" (John 20:21-23)

It is clear enough that someone could take this as more than simply an exhortation to forgiveness, even though others might take it as nothing more than that.

In the article I linked, David Mills is extending that kind of latitude to his friend in Christ, Russell Moore, who says exactly what you say about the authority to forgive sins.  He affirms: "I respect him for asserting something he believes fundamental.  The practice of confession really does point to very deep and pastorally important differences between Catholics and Protestants."  That's what I'm talking about.

In your belief is one forgiven only when they confess to a priest of the RCC.

I know one who has a very close relationship with our Lord who has repented of sin not by confession to a priest but a genuine confession of heart and never did that sin again thirty five years

Who has been forgiven? the one who confessed to the a Catholic priest
The one who confessed to Christ or both?

Both have been forgiven with genuine repentance, but we cannot ignore the Scriptures and what it tells us about having a Church and the clergy that exists within it. There is a great benefit to having someone to talk too, who has real power given to him by Jesus Christ himself, a power that was passed on accordingly. Ignoring that is ignoring all that went on and was taught for over a thousand years. (Before mere men decided differently of course)

Offline chosenone

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #10 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 15:51:49 »
The thing is that abortion is forgiven by God though Jesus anyway, and doesnt need a priest or Bishop to have anything to do with it, and that is sadly one of the vast differences between what many believe from the Bibles teaching, and what the RC church thinks.

I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever, I have been to churches of several different denominations and dont belong to a particular one myself,  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isnt, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity. I respect people for who they are, but I can never respect a religion that leads so may into such error.

And as I've said before, all you have is your new interpretation of the Scriptures that was also thought up by men, rejecting what had been taught about Christianity for hundreds upon hundreds upon hundreds of years. So which new Scriptural interpretation that came about by men is correct? Is it the one that you have come up with by yourself, or perhaps it's the JW's, or the Mormons, or any one of the thousands of Christian sects out there?

I dont belong to any denomination at all and  think that its tragic that so soon the early church went off into error.I am also grateful that some eventually broke away from that church where error was so rife.

 We now have Gods word in the Bible, and its clear there that we should go to God through Jesus to be forgiven of any sin. We need no go between whether that be a clergy member or Mary or whoever. Its not a question of interpretation, its just not there that someone who has committed certain sins must see a priest or Bishop. Its another man made teaching.
« Last Edit: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 17:08:59 by chosenone »

Offline chosenone

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #11 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 15:56:32 »
I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever [...]  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isn't, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity.

Admittedly, some things taught by the Catholic Church go beyond the obvious meaning of any one scriptural text, but formal forgiveness of sins is spelled out quite explicitly in John 20:

Quote
"Jesus therefore said to them again, 'Peace be to you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.'  When he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, 'Receive the Holy Spirit!  Whoever's sins you forgive, they are forgiven them. Whoever's sins you retain, they have been retained.'" (John 20:21-23)

It is clear enough that someone could take this as more than simply an exhortation to forgiveness, even though others might take it as nothing more than that.

In the article I linked, David Mills is extending that kind of latitude to his friend in Christ, Russell Moore, who says exactly what you say about the authority to forgive sins.  He affirms: "I respect him for asserting something he believes fundamental.  The practice of confession really does point to very deep and pastorally important differences between Catholics and Protestants."  That's what I'm talking about.

In your belief is one forgiven only when they confess to a priest of the RCC.

I know one who has a very close relationship with our Lord who has repented of sin not by confession to a priest but a genuine confession of heart and never did that sin again thirty five years

Who has been forgiven? the one who confessed to the a Catholic priest
The one who confessed to Christ or both?

Both have been forgiven with genuine repentance, but we cannot ignore the Scriptures and what it tells us about having a Church and the clergy that exists within it. There is a great benefit to having someone to talk too, who has real power given to him by Jesus Christ himself, a power that was passed on accordingly. Ignoring that is ignoring all that went on and was taught for over a thousand years. (Before mere men decided differently of course)


 IF anyone chooses to tell someone of their sin, whether that be a family member or friend or church leader that is their
choice, however, its to God they need to go and repent, through Jesus. They need tell no one else if they dont want to. How dare anyone or any church tell others that they sins are so especially bad that they cant be forgiven unless they go to a Bishop or priest when God has already forgiven if they repented.  ::frown::  Especially when God doesn't tell them to. 

Offline chosenone

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #12 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 15:58:05 »
This is a beautiful idea that you put forth here in this thread, but as evidenced by many of those who come here to the Catholic section it is an impossibility. It is clear they are not here to learn or have genuine Christian fellowship, but to constantly belittle, accuse, berate, and every other negative connotation of the Catholic faith tradition that can be thought of. No, you will never see any mutual respect on this forum towards Catholics by most of the other members of the other Christian traditions who come here.
 

Its hard to like and respect a faith that leads many in such error. as for why we come here, I was answering the op's post. I dont doubt your sincerity, but we can be sincerely wrong.

Offline Ladonia

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #13 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 16:48:19 »
This is a beautiful idea that you put forth here in this thread, but as evidenced by many of those who come here to the Catholic section it is an impossibility. It is clear they are not here to learn or have genuine Christian fellowship, but to constantly belittle, accuse, berate, and every other negative connotation of the Catholic faith tradition that can be thought of. No, you will never see any mutual respect on this forum towards Catholics by most of the other members of the other Christian traditions who come here.
 

Its hard to like and respect a faith that leads many in such error. as for why we come here, I was answering the op's post. I dont doubt your sincerity, but we can be sincerely wrong.

The supposed error of Christian orthodoxy is only your opinion, nothing more, nothing less

Offline Ladonia

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #14 on: Wed Sep 09, 2015 - 17:05:43 »
I have no problems with differences of opinion on what some verses may mean, or how others worship or pray or whatever [...]  but when the differences are between what is in the Bible and what isn't, between what God actually says and what has been added later by man, there can be no unity.

Admittedly, some things taught by the Catholic Church go beyond the obvious meaning of any one scriptural text, but formal forgiveness of sins is spelled out quite explicitly in John 20:

Quote
"Jesus therefore said to them again, 'Peace be to you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.'  When he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, 'Receive the Holy Spirit!  Whoever's sins you forgive, they are forgiven them. Whoever's sins you retain, they have been retained.'" (John 20:21-23)

It is clear enough that someone could take this as more than simply an exhortation to forgiveness, even though others might take it as nothing more than that.

In the article I linked, David Mills is extending that kind of latitude to his friend in Christ, Russell Moore, who says exactly what you say about the authority to forgive sins.  He affirms: "I respect him for asserting something he believes fundamental.  The practice of confession really does point to very deep and pastorally important differences between Catholics and Protestants."  That's what I'm talking about.

In your belief is one forgiven only when they confess to a priest of the RCC.

I know one who has a very close relationship with our Lord who has repented of sin not by confession to a priest but a genuine confession of heart and never did that sin again thirty five years

Who has been forgiven? the one who confessed to the a Catholic priest
The one who confessed to Christ or both?

Both have been forgiven with genuine repentance, but we cannot ignore the Scriptures and what it tells us about having a Church and the clergy that exists within it. There is a great benefit to having someone to talk too, who has real power given to him by Jesus Christ himself, a power that was passed on accordingly. Ignoring that is ignoring all that went on and was taught for over a thousand years. (Before mere men decided differently of course)


 IF anyone chooses to tell someone of their sin, whether that be a family member or friend or church leader that is their
choice, however, its to God they need to go and repent, through Jesus. They need tell no one else if they dont want to. How dare anyone or any church tell others that they sins are so especially bad that they cant be forgiven unless they go to a Bishop or priest when God has already forgiven if they repented.  ::frown::  Especially when God doesn't tell them to.

Again, only in your fallible opinion. The Scriptures are clear about the Church and it's ability to offer forgiveness  IN HIS NAME.  "So Jesus said to them again, Peace be with you; as the Father has sent Me, I also send you. And when He had said this, He breathed on them and said to them, "Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, their sins have been forgiven them; if you retain the sins of any, they have been retained." (Jn 20:21-23)

And:…"If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church; and if he refuses to listen even to the church, let him be to you as a Gentile and a tax collector. Truly I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall have been bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall have been loosed in heaven. Again I say to you, that if two of you agree on earth about anything that they may ask, it shall be done for them by My Father who is in heaven".… (Matt 18:17-19)

None of this is too difficult. There's the Church to which we go to sort things out (He didn't say to just open up the Bible), which was made up of the men who had the authority to pass things on to others.

Offline epiphanius

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #15 on: Thu Sep 10, 2015 - 09:22:18 »
Its hard to like and respect a faith that leads many in such error. as for why we come here, I was answering the op's post. I don't doubt your sincerity, but we can be sincerely wrong.
Chosen,

I understand that you sincerely believe that all Catholics are seriously in error, but in all fairness, you did *not* answer the OP at all, all you did was shout it down.  Your comments addressed the OP in very general terms, focusing *only* on the event that served as a jumping off point for the *real* discussion, while ignoring the latter completely.  When I repeated some of the talking points and asked you to address them, all you did was repeat yourself--almost verbatim.

I assume your visits to the Catholic forum are to try and convince Catholics of their error, but all I'm hearing is, "you're in error, you're in error, you're in error" repeated over and over, like a mantra.  Do you *really* think this is going to persuade *anybody*?


Offline chosenone

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #16 on: Thu Sep 10, 2015 - 09:51:05 »
Its hard to like and respect a faith that leads many in such error. as for why we come here, I was answering the op's post. I don't doubt your sincerity, but we can be sincerely wrong.
Chosen,

I understand that you sincerely believe that all Catholics are seriously in error, but in all fairness, you did *not* answer the OP at all, all you did was shout it down.  Your comments addressed the OP in very general terms, focusing *only* on the event that served as a jumping off point for the *real* discussion, while ignoring the latter completely.  When I repeated some of the talking points and asked you to address them, all you did was repeat yourself--almost verbatim.

I assume your visits to the Catholic forum are to try and convince Catholics of their error, but all I'm hearing is, "you're in error, you're in error, you're in error" repeated over and over, like a mantra.  Do you *really* think this is going to persuade *anybody*?


All I can do it warn them.  ::shrug::

Offline Catholica

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #17 on: Thu Sep 10, 2015 - 12:50:18 »
Its hard to like and respect a faith that leads many in such error. as for why we come here, I was answering the op's post. I don't doubt your sincerity, but we can be sincerely wrong.
Chosen,

I understand that you sincerely believe that all Catholics are seriously in error, but in all fairness, you did *not* answer the OP at all, all you did was shout it down.  Your comments addressed the OP in very general terms, focusing *only* on the event that served as a jumping off point for the *real* discussion, while ignoring the latter completely.  When I repeated some of the talking points and asked you to address them, all you did was repeat yourself--almost verbatim.

I assume your visits to the Catholic forum are to try and convince Catholics of their error, but all I'm hearing is, "you're in error, you're in error, you're in error" repeated over and over, like a mantra.  Do you *really* think this is going to persuade *anybody*?


All I can do it warn them.  ::shrug::

Arguments unsupported by evidence are rightly dismissed, and the posts you've made in this thread fall under that category.
« Last Edit: Fri Sep 11, 2015 - 07:29:52 by Catholica »

Offline skeeter

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #18 on: Fri Sep 11, 2015 - 01:51:17 »
why should anyone believe you?

Offline trifecta

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #19 on: Sat Sep 12, 2015 - 07:33:53 »
As to the OP, as one who has been in all three camps (RCC, evangelical, and Orthodoxy), it is something I have thought about.

I try to see the side of the others . . . and usually succeed. 

To the Bible-believing Protestant, he sincerely is trying to save others from  error.

To the RCC (and especially here many converts to that church), they see God's work in a more expanded way through the church and it's reality.

For the Orthodox, we claim that the Holy Spirit is in the Orthodox Church, but he blows where ever He wills.


While as someone posted, one can be sincere but sincerely wrong, that is true, but we see even Paul's view evolve in the New Testament. 

Sincerity is enough to have a good relationship with my brother (or sister) of a different faith tradition.

Now, you can say Nazis were sincere in their beliefs, which is true.  But there beliefs are not based in
love or in the true God.  What we have in common is we worship the same God of love.  And that is
enough to find common ground.

Offline Amo

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #20 on: Sat Sep 12, 2015 - 08:20:41 »
A church that believes in the power of human legislation to bring about their ultimate goals, can talk about mutual respect all it wants, but the pursuit of such reveals the opposite intent. There is no hint of mutual respect, in trying to make ones moral and social doctrines the law of the land. Especially without the consent of those they are lording themselves over. This has nothing to do with authentic "Christianity".

Offline Ladonia

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #21 on: Sat Sep 12, 2015 - 16:41:14 »
As to the OP, as one who has been in all three camps (RCC, evangelical, and Orthodoxy), it is something I have thought about.

I try to see the side of the others . . . and usually succeed. 

To the Bible-believing Protestant, he sincerely is trying to save others from  error.

To the RCC (and especially here many converts to that church), they see God's work in a more expanded way through the church and it's reality.

For the Orthodox, we claim that the Holy Spirit is in the Orthodox Church, but he blows where ever He wills.


While as someone posted, one can be sincere but sincerely wrong, that is true, but we see even Paul's view evolve in the New Testament. 

Sincerity is enough to have a good relationship with my brother (or sister) of a different faith tradition.

Now, you can say Nazis were sincere in their beliefs, which is true.  But there beliefs are not based in
love or in the true God.  What we have in common is we worship the same God of love.  And that is
enough to find common ground.
 

"What we have in common is we worship the same God of love.  And that is enough to find common ground".
Very well said, but not for some who come and post here. Could you ever get some of our antagonists  to attend Mass with us in the spirit of  Christian love and worship God as we do?  Sadly, I don't think so.

Offline mclees8

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #22 on: Mon Sep 14, 2015 - 11:01:10 »
As to the OP, as one who has been in all three camps (RCC, evangelical, and Orthodoxy), it is something I have thought about.

I try to see the side of the others . . . and usually succeed. 

To the Bible-believing Protestant, he sincerely is trying to save others from  error.

To the RCC (and especially here many converts to that church), they see God's work in a more expanded way through the church and it's reality.

For the Orthodox, we claim that the Holy Spirit is in the Orthodox Church, but he blows where ever He wills.


While as someone posted, one can be sincere but sincerely wrong, that is true, but we see even Paul's view evolve in the New Testament. 

Sincerity is enough to have a good relationship with my brother (or sister) of a different faith tradition.

Now, you can say Nazis were sincere in their beliefs, which is true.  But there beliefs are not based in
love or in the true God.  What we have in common is we worship the same God of love.  And that is
enough to find common ground.
 

"What we have in common is we worship the same God of love.  And that is enough to find common ground".
Very well said, but not for some who come and post here. Could you ever get some of our antagonists  to attend Mass with us in the spirit of  Christian love and worship God as we do?  Sadly, I don't think so.

Our common love for God must be reflected in our love for one another as his people , not in the unconditional acceptance of different faith ideals and doctrines. Only God can  fix that problem and he will in that day

Offline Ladonia

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #23 on: Mon Sep 14, 2015 - 12:05:40 »
As to the OP, as one who has been in all three camps (RCC, evangelical, and Orthodoxy), it is something I have thought about.

I try to see the side of the others . . . and usually succeed. 

To the Bible-believing Protestant, he sincerely is trying to save others from  error.

To the RCC (and especially here many converts to that church), they see God's work in a more expanded way through the church and it's reality.

For the Orthodox, we claim that the Holy Spirit is in the Orthodox Church, but he blows where ever He wills.


While as someone posted, one can be sincere but sincerely wrong, that is true, but we see even Paul's view evolve in the New Testament. 

Sincerity is enough to have a good relationship with my brother (or sister) of a different faith tradition.

Now, you can say Nazis were sincere in their beliefs, which is true.  But there beliefs are not based in
love or in the true God.  What we have in common is we worship the same God of love.  And that is
enough to find common ground.
 

"What we have in common is we worship the same God of love.  And that is enough to find common ground".
Very well said, but not for some who come and post here. Could you ever get some of our antagonists  to attend Mass with us in the spirit of  Christian love and worship God as we do?  Sadly, I don't think so.

Our common love for God must be reflected in our love for one another as his people , not in the unconditional acceptance of different faith ideals and doctrines. Only God can  fix that problem and he will in that day

Very well said!  ::clappingoverhead::

Offline epiphanius

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Re: Christian Friendship and Accepting Each Other's Doctrinal Differences
« Reply #24 on: Tue Sep 15, 2015 - 10:37:32 »
As to the OP, as one who has been in all three camps (RCC, evangelical, and Orthodoxy), it is something I have thought about.

I try to see the side of the others . . . and usually succeed.

Trifecta, good to hear from you!

I really believe that what unites us--namely, Christ Himself--is *far* greater than what divides us.

What divides us is merely words--*not* the revealed word of God, but how we interpret it.  (And I would contend that all too often, Christians of all stripes cling to their own doctrinal formulas, while barely glimpsing the truth of the mystery that stands beneath the formula.)


For the Orthodox, we claim that the Holy Spirit is in the Orthodox Church, but he blows wherever He wills.

Amen.  I also believe He is present in all the churches, to the degree that we will listen to Him.


Now, you can say Nazis were sincere in their beliefs, which is true.  But their beliefs are not based in love or in the true God.  What we have in common is we worship the same God of love.  And that is enough to find common ground.

"... the same God of love."  I would add, "Who reveals Himself in the Bible, and especially in the person of His Son, Jesus Christ."