Author Topic: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong  (Read 751 times)

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Offline Happy22

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CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« on: July 31, 2013, 06:56:08 AM »

 
Lewis wrote another theological book near the end of his brilliant, literary career entitled The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays (1960). In it, he alleges surprisingly, “the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else” (p. 97). So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return.

Do you agree the Jesus was wrong?

Offline Red Baker

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2013, 07:57:34 AM »

 
Lewis wrote another theological book near the end of his brilliant, literary career entitled The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays (1960). In it, he alleges surprisingly, “the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else” (p. 97). So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return.

Do you agree the Jesus was wrong?

C.S. Lewis was under a strong delusion of Satan. 

#1~ "And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’

C.I Lewis  was in darkness concerning "this generation"~it has absolutely no reference to the then present generation of Jews living!  This generation has reference to the generation of the wicked, that the Lord Jesus just spent his whole discourse speaking against.  The blind leading the blind!

#2~ "And he was wrong."What a bold devilish spirit!    We will see.

#3~"He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else” (p. 97)~

Jesus just gave a long discourse concerning the last days of this world, and any who have a understanding of the scriptures overall, knows that C. L.  Lewis is the one that knew nothing of the truth.  Jesus was interpreting Daniel for any one who have eyes to see and ears to hear.  Jesus' humanity did not know the day or hour in which the Son of God would return, that is the only thing that was hidden in the secret will of The eternal God.  This is a great mystery to us concerning the complex nature of Jesus being both all man and all God.  His Divinity knew the day and hour; his humanity did not.

But understanding the mysteries hidden within the scriptures themselves, he did, for he was the greatest prophet that ever lived in the flesh, bar none.

RB
« Last Edit: July 31, 2013, 07:59:46 AM by Red Baker »

Offline chosenone

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2013, 08:00:34 AM »
Jesus will come when God tells Him to and not before. This is another thread the same as the one you started earlier.
Why are you driven to think you have to convince everyone that Jesus has already come when we all know he hasn't? I dont feel driven to convince you He hasn't, because you will find out soon enough.

Online AVZ

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2013, 08:27:24 AM »

 
Lewis wrote another theological book near the end of his brilliant, literary career entitled The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays (1960). In it, he alleges surprisingly, “the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else” (p. 97). So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return.

Do you agree the Jesus was wrong?

This is quite a misconstruction of what CS Lewis said.
Following the above paragraph, CS Lewis writes another 3 or 4 paragraphs trying to explain the possible misconception of this verse in the Bible.

Would you be interested to know the answer to your question, then you should read on and find out what else CS Lewis has to say.

Offline TonkaTim

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2013, 08:47:46 AM »
Psalm 22:30 A seed shall serve him; it shall be accounted to the Lord for a generation.

I believe that is the answer to the question. David's 22 Psalm is about Christ. I believe when Christ is talking about "this generation", He is talking about Himself.

"This generation" is will not pass away because He is risen & lives forever:

"39 See now that I, even I, am he, and there is no god with me: I kill, and I make alive; I wound, and I heal: neither is there any that can deliver out of my hand.40 For I lift up my hand to heaven, and say, I live for ever. - Deuteronomy 32
« Last Edit: July 31, 2013, 08:51:01 AM by TonkaTim »

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2013, 08:47:46 AM »



Offline Red Baker

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2013, 08:53:34 AM »
Psalm 22:30 A seed shall serve him; it shall be accounted to the Lord for a generation.

I believe that is the answer to the question. David's 22 Psalm is about Christ. I believe when Christ is talking about "this generation", He is talking about Himself.

"This generation" is will not pass away because He is risen & lives forever:

"39 See now that I, even I, am he, and there is no god with me: I kill, and I make alive; I wound, and I heal: neither is there any that can deliver out of my hand.40 For I lift up my hand to heaven, and say, I live for ever. - Deuteronomy 32

You are wrong.  Read Psalm 12, and David will clearly reveal to us who is "this generation".

RB

Offline Happy22

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2013, 09:02:59 AM »

 
Lewis wrote another theological book near the end of his brilliant, literary career entitled The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays (1960). In it, he alleges surprisingly, “the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else” (p. 97). So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return.

Do you agree the Jesus was wrong?

This is quite a misconstruction of what CS Lewis said.
Following the above paragraph, CS Lewis writes another 3 or 4 paragraphs trying to explain the possible misconception of this verse in the Bible.

Would you be interested to know the answer to your question, then you should read on and find out what else CS Lewis has to say.

This is the quote:

Say what you like,” we shall be told, “the apocalyptic beliefs of the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else.”

It is certainly the most embarrassing verse in the Bible. Yet how teasing, also, that within fourteen words of it should come the statement “But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father.” The one exhibition of error and the one confession of ignorance grow side by side. That they stood thus in the mouth of Jesus himself, and were not merely placed thus by the reporter, we surely need not doubt. Unless the reporter were perfectly honest he would never have recorded the confession of ignorance at all; he could have had no motive for doing so except a desire to tell the whole truth. And unless later copyists were equally honest they would never have preserved the (apparently) mistaken prediction about “this generation” after the passage of time had shown the (apparent) mistake. This passage (Mark 13:30-32) and the cry “Why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mark 15:34) together make up the strongest proof that the New Testament is historically reliable. The evangelists have the first great characteristic of honest witnesses: they mention facts which are, at first sight, damaging to their main contention.

The facts, then, are these: that Jesus professed himself (in some sense) ignorant, and within a moment showed that he really was so. To believe in the Incarnation, to believe that he is God, makes it hard to understand how he could be ignorant; but also makes it certain that, if he said he could be ignorant, then ignorant he could really be. For a God who can be ignorant is less baffling than a God who falsely professes ignorance. The answer of theologians is that the God-Man was omniscient as God, and ignorant as Man. This, no doubt, is true, though it cannot be imagined. Nor indeed can the unconsciousness of Christ in sleep be imagined, nor the twilight of reason in his infancy; still less his merely organic life in his mother’s womb… It would be difficult, and, to me, repellent, to suppose that Jesus never asked a genuine question, that is, a question to which he did not know the answer. That would make of his humanity something so unlike ours as scarcely to deserve the name. I find it easier to believe that when be said “Who touched me?” (Luke 7:45) he really wanted to know.
The highlighted parts are Lewis' own words ... he says Jesus is ignorant, and at the end of this quote: that He really did not know who touched Him.

Offline TonkaTim

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2013, 09:25:39 AM »
Psalm 22:30 A seed shall serve him; it shall be accounted to the Lord for a generation.

I believe that is the answer to the question. David's 22 Psalm is about Christ. I believe when Christ is talking about "this generation", He is talking about Himself.

"This generation" is will not pass away because He is risen & lives forever:

"39 See now that I, even I, am he, and there is no god with me: I kill, and I make alive; I wound, and I heal: neither is there any that can deliver out of my hand.40 For I lift up my hand to heaven, and say, I live for ever. - Deuteronomy 32

You are wrong.  Read Psalm 12, and David will clearly reveal to us who is "this generation".

RB

I might would be more inclined to agree if they were they same word used in the same context with the same specific meaning.

Psalm 12 - הַדּ֖וֹר -  hadur

Psalm 22 - לַדּֽוֹר׃- ladur


Since they are not the exact same specific word, With ladur alluding to a coming generation who is the seed we all know & understand is a promise to Abraham fulfilled as Christ. I think the context of "this generation" is Psalms 22 is clearly Christ. Even more clear since the context of Psalm 22 is about Christ & even His crucifixion, a prophecy 1000 years prior.

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2013, 09:36:08 AM »

 
Lewis wrote another theological book near the end of his brilliant, literary career entitled The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays (1960). In it, he alleges surprisingly, “the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else” (p. 97). So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return.

Do you agree the Jesus was wrong?

This is quite a misconstruction of what CS Lewis said.
Following the above paragraph, CS Lewis writes another 3 or 4 paragraphs trying to explain the possible misconception of this verse in the Bible.

Would you be interested to know the answer to your question, then you should read on and find out what else CS Lewis has to say.

This is the quote:

Say what you like,” we shall be told, “the apocalyptic beliefs of the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else.”

It is certainly the most embarrassing verse in the Bible. Yet how teasing, also, that within fourteen words of it should come the statement “But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father.” The one exhibition of error and the one confession of ignorance grow side by side. That they stood thus in the mouth of Jesus himself, and were not merely placed thus by the reporter, we surely need not doubt. Unless the reporter were perfectly honest he would never have recorded the confession of ignorance at all; he could have had no motive for doing so except a desire to tell the whole truth. And unless later copyists were equally honest they would never have preserved the (apparently) mistaken prediction about “this generation” after the passage of time had shown the (apparent) mistake. This passage (Mark 13:30-32) and the cry “Why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mark 15:34) together make up the strongest proof that the New Testament is historically reliable. The evangelists have the first great characteristic of honest witnesses: they mention facts which are, at first sight, damaging to their main contention.

The facts, then, are these: that Jesus professed himself (in some sense) ignorant, and within a moment showed that he really was so. To believe in the Incarnation, to believe that he is God, makes it hard to understand how he could be ignorant; but also makes it certain that, if he said he could be ignorant, then ignorant he could really be. For a God who can be ignorant is less baffling than a God who falsely professes ignorance. The answer of theologians is that the God-Man was omniscient as God, and ignorant as Man. This, no doubt, is true, though it cannot be imagined. Nor indeed can the unconsciousness of Christ in sleep be imagined, nor the twilight of reason in his infancy; still less his merely organic life in his mother’s womb… It would be difficult, and, to me, repellent, to suppose that Jesus never asked a genuine question, that is, a question to which he did not know the answer. That would make of his humanity something so unlike ours as scarcely to deserve the name. I find it easier to believe that when be said “Who touched me?” (Luke 7:45) he really wanted to know.
The highlighted parts are Lewis' own words ... he says Jesus is ignorant, and at the end of this quote: that He really did not know who touched Him.

This was your claim in your start post:

"So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return."

Now that we have the all the applicable paragraphs, you can read for yourself that CS Lewis never made such a statement.

Offline Happy22

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2013, 11:15:39 AM »
Jesus will come when God tells Him to and not before. This is another thread the same as the one you started earlier.
Why are you driven to think you have to convince everyone that Jesus has already come when we all know he hasn't? I dont feel driven to convince you He hasn't, because you will find out soon enough.
I notice you did not answer the question again. Did Jesus lie?

Anything which can enhance and improve your relationship with God is important. Would you not like to know if your understanding of Scripture is off by even a small degree, and would you not agree that if the Kingdom of God is a present reality that is a rather important issue to be aware of? Eschatology affects virtually all aspects of Christianity; in fact almost every message preached by Jesus had an eschatological aspect to it: the message was often about critical issues like the coming Kingdom of God and the restoration of God’s presence to people’s lives.

The apparent belief that failure of these prophesies to come true has led to skepticism about the reliability of the Bible and the deity of Christ. Preterism solves this problem by maintaining that these prophecies did, in fact, have a first century fulfillment. If Preterist eschatology is true, then Christians can offer a much MORE POSITIVE PERSPECTIVE to the world, rather than a fatalistic end of the world where our actions make no difference. If we are confident as Christians that WE CAN POSITIVELY INFLUENCE THE WORLD around us, we can perhaps motivate believers to actively be involved in helping the poor, caring for the environment, actively participate in politics and preserving the world for all future generations. PRETERISM OFFERS HOPS and maintains the integrity of the Scripture and of the entire Christian faith while it defends it against other religions and Christian cults that place the Second Coming of Jesus after A.D. 70.



Offline Happy22

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2013, 11:20:07 AM »

 
Lewis wrote another theological book near the end of his brilliant, literary career entitled The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays (1960). In it, he alleges surprisingly, “the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else” (p. 97). So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return.

Do you agree the Jesus was wrong?

This is quite a misconstruction of what CS Lewis said.
Following the above paragraph, CS Lewis writes another 3 or 4 paragraphs trying to explain the possible misconception of this verse in the Bible.

Would you be interested to know the answer to your question, then you should read on and find out what else CS Lewis has to say.

This is the quote:

Say what you like,” we shall be told, “the apocalyptic beliefs of the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else.”

It is certainly the most embarrassing verse in the Bible. Yet how teasing, also, that within fourteen words of it should come the statement “But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father.” The one exhibition of error and the one confession of ignorance grow side by side. That they stood thus in the mouth of Jesus himself, and were not merely placed thus by the reporter, we surely need not doubt. Unless the reporter were perfectly honest he would never have recorded the confession of ignorance at all; he could have had no motive for doing so except a desire to tell the whole truth. And unless later copyists were equally honest they would never have preserved the (apparently) mistaken prediction about “this generation” after the passage of time had shown the (apparent) mistake. This passage (Mark 13:30-32) and the cry “Why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mark 15:34) together make up the strongest proof that the New Testament is historically reliable. The evangelists have the first great characteristic of honest witnesses: they mention facts which are, at first sight, damaging to their main contention.

The facts, then, are these: that Jesus professed himself (in some sense) ignorant, and within a moment showed that he really was so. To believe in the Incarnation, to believe that he is God, makes it hard to understand how he could be ignorant; but also makes it certain that, if he said he could be ignorant, then ignorant he could really be. For a God who can be ignorant is less baffling than a God who falsely professes ignorance. The answer of theologians is that the God-Man was omniscient as God, and ignorant as Man. This, no doubt, is true, though it cannot be imagined. Nor indeed can the unconsciousness of Christ in sleep be imagined, nor the twilight of reason in his infancy; still less his merely organic life in his mother’s womb… It would be difficult, and, to me, repellent, to suppose that Jesus never asked a genuine question, that is, a question to which he did not know the answer. That would make of his humanity something so unlike ours as scarcely to deserve the name. I find it easier to believe that when be said “Who touched me?” (Luke 7:45) he really wanted to know.
The highlighted parts are Lewis' own words ... he says Jesus is ignorant, and at the end of this quote: that He really did not know who touched Him.

This was your claim in your start post:

"So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return."

Now that we have the all the applicable paragraphs, you can read for yourself that CS Lewis never made such a statement.

You aren't reading the first sentence.  You seem to have a misguided view of what CS Lewis believed. In his autobiography (Surprised by Joy), Lewis tells how at age 13 he abandoned his Anglican faith due to the influence of a school mistress who was involved with "Theosophy, Rosicrucianism, Spiritualism; the whole Anglo-American Occultist tradition." And Lewis developed a "lust" for the occult that remained with him even after he returned to Anglicanism. He said,

"And that started in me something with which, on and off, I have had plenty of trouble since--the desire for the preternatural, simply as such, the passion for the Occult. Not everyone has this disease; those who have will know what I mean. I once tried to describe it in a novel. It is a spiritual lust; and like the lust of the body it has the fatal power of making everything else in the world seem uninteresting while it lasts." ("Surprised by Joy," Harcourt Brace, 1955, pages 58-60.)

The moment you mention Matthew 16:27-28 to any preacher or theology expert, the age old tactics of explaining away scriptures starts. That is when CS Lewis made his statement that Jesus was wrong.

Offline Red Baker

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2013, 12:50:57 PM »
Jesus will come when God tells Him to and not before. This is another thread the same as the one you started earlier.
Why are you driven to think you have to convince everyone that Jesus has already come when we all know he hasn't? I dont feel driven to convince you He hasn't, because you will find out soon enough.
I notice you did not answer the question again. Did Jesus lie?

Anything which can enhance and improve your relationship with God is important. Would you not like to know if your understanding of Scripture is off by even a small degree, and would you not agree that if the Kingdom of God is a present reality that is a rather important issue to be aware of? Eschatology affects virtually all aspects of Christianity; in fact almost every message preached by Jesus had an eschatological aspect to it: the message was often about critical issues like the coming Kingdom of God and the restoration of God’s presence to people’s lives.

The apparent belief that failure of these prophesies to come true has led to skepticism about the reliability of the Bible and the deity of Christ. Preterism solves this problem by maintaining that these prophecies did, in fact, have a first century fulfillment. If Preterist eschatology is true, then Christians can offer a much MORE POSITIVE PERSPECTIVE to the world, rather than a fatalistic end of the world where our actions make no difference. If we are confident as Christians that WE CAN POSITIVELY INFLUENCE THE WORLD around us, we can perhaps motivate believers to actively be involved in helping the poor, caring for the environment, actively participate in politics and preserving the world for all future generations. PRETERISM OFFERS HOPS and maintains the integrity of the Scripture and of the entire Christian faith while it defends it against other religions and Christian cults that place the Second Coming of Jesus after A.D. 70.

Happy22 said these words:"Preterism solves this problem by maintaining that these prophecies did, in fact, have a first century fulfillment."

Preterism is a lie.  Your corrupt system is supported not by the word of God, but must use extra-biblical means, such as, history to even give it any credibility, or consideration by some serious believers.  You house of cards are built upon sound bites and history, period.  A wise man can easy see through the corruption that your theology is built upon.  Your system is a hopeless system, that has no blessed hope for Believers to hope for.

I must run, but shall return.

RB

Offline Happy22

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2013, 01:11:54 PM »
Jesus will come when God tells Him to and not before. This is another thread the same as the one you started earlier.
Why are you driven to think you have to convince everyone that Jesus has already come when we all know he hasn't? I dont feel driven to convince you He hasn't, because you will find out soon enough.
I notice you did not answer the question again. Did Jesus lie?

Anything which can enhance and improve your relationship with God is important. Would you not like to know if your understanding of Scripture is off by even a small degree, and would you not agree that if the Kingdom of God is a present reality that is a rather important issue to be aware of? Eschatology affects virtually all aspects of Christianity; in fact almost every message preached by Jesus had an eschatological aspect to it: the message was often about critical issues like the coming Kingdom of God and the restoration of God’s presence to people’s lives.

The apparent belief that failure of these prophesies to come true has led to skepticism about the reliability of the Bible and the deity of Christ. Preterism solves this problem by maintaining that these prophecies did, in fact, have a first century fulfillment. If Preterist eschatology is true, then Christians can offer a much MORE POSITIVE PERSPECTIVE to the world, rather than a fatalistic end of the world where our actions make no difference. If we are confident as Christians that WE CAN POSITIVELY INFLUENCE THE WORLD around us, we can perhaps motivate believers to actively be involved in helping the poor, caring for the environment, actively participate in politics and preserving the world for all future generations. PRETERISM OFFERS HOPS and maintains the integrity of the Scripture and of the entire Christian faith while it defends it against other religions and Christian cults that place the Second Coming of Jesus after A.D. 70.

Happy22 said these words:"Preterism solves this problem by maintaining that these prophecies did, in fact, have a first century fulfillment."

Preterism is a lie.  Your corrupt system is supported not by the word of God, but must use extra-biblical means, such as, history to even give it any credibility, or consideration by some serious believers.  You house of cards are built upon sound bites and history, period.  A wise man can easy see through the corruption that your theology is built upon.  Your system is a hopeless system, that has no blessed hope for Believers to hope for.

I must run, but shall return.

RB
I don't read Hal Lindsey or Tim Lahaye or other Left Behind books, so I have only the Bible as my guide.

 It appears from the scriptures that the chief concern of Jesus was to bring about the Kingdom of God. The two major issues with the Kingdom are of timing and nature, allowing Preterism to offer solid answers to those seeking questions about the Kingdom:

The Timing of the Kingdom
Was “at hand”
Was to come “in the days of the kings” described in Daniel 2 (i.e. the first century)
The Nature of the Kingdom
Is “not of this world”
Is a “new way of thinking”
It will “renew” the creation, especially the hearts of men
It is therefore unreasonable for Christians to expect the Kingdom of God to be anything other than a spiritual reality. The purpose of Jesus was to bring good news to the poor, freedom to prisoners, and comfort to those who mourn (see Isaiah 61). Jesus did not come to institute an earthly kingdom in which He would rule in a theocratic-style dictatorship; rather he came to free us from our presuppositions, from sin and its guilt, and bring healing to our hearts. Yes, the Kingdom of God did come in the first century and it is a present reality.

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #13 on: July 31, 2013, 07:11:46 PM »

 
Lewis wrote another theological book near the end of his brilliant, literary career entitled The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays (1960). In it, he alleges surprisingly, “the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else” (p. 97). So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return.

Do you agree the Jesus was wrong?

This is quite a misconstruction of what CS Lewis said.
Following the above paragraph, CS Lewis writes another 3 or 4 paragraphs trying to explain the possible misconception of this verse in the Bible.

Would you be interested to know the answer to your question, then you should read on and find out what else CS Lewis has to say.

This is the quote:

Say what you like,” we shall be told, “the apocalyptic beliefs of the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else.”

It is certainly the most embarrassing verse in the Bible. Yet how teasing, also, that within fourteen words of it should come the statement “But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father.” The one exhibition of error and the one confession of ignorance grow side by side. That they stood thus in the mouth of Jesus himself, and were not merely placed thus by the reporter, we surely need not doubt. Unless the reporter were perfectly honest he would never have recorded the confession of ignorance at all; he could have had no motive for doing so except a desire to tell the whole truth. And unless later copyists were equally honest they would never have preserved the (apparently) mistaken prediction about “this generation” after the passage of time had shown the (apparent) mistake. This passage (Mark 13:30-32) and the cry “Why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mark 15:34) together make up the strongest proof that the New Testament is historically reliable. The evangelists have the first great characteristic of honest witnesses: they mention facts which are, at first sight, damaging to their main contention.

The facts, then, are these: that Jesus professed himself (in some sense) ignorant, and within a moment showed that he really was so. To believe in the Incarnation, to believe that he is God, makes it hard to understand how he could be ignorant; but also makes it certain that, if he said he could be ignorant, then ignorant he could really be. For a God who can be ignorant is less baffling than a God who falsely professes ignorance. The answer of theologians is that the God-Man was omniscient as God, and ignorant as Man. This, no doubt, is true, though it cannot be imagined. Nor indeed can the unconsciousness of Christ in sleep be imagined, nor the twilight of reason in his infancy; still less his merely organic life in his mother’s womb… It would be difficult, and, to me, repellent, to suppose that Jesus never asked a genuine question, that is, a question to which he did not know the answer. That would make of his humanity something so unlike ours as scarcely to deserve the name. I find it easier to believe that when be said “Who touched me?” (Luke 7:45) he really wanted to know.
The highlighted parts are Lewis' own words ... he says Jesus is ignorant, and at the end of this quote: that He really did not know who touched Him.

This was your claim in your start post:

"So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return."

Now that we have the all the applicable paragraphs, you can read for yourself that CS Lewis never made such a statement.

You aren't reading the first sentence.  You seem to have a misguided view of what CS Lewis believed. In his autobiography (Surprised by Joy), Lewis tells how at age 13 he abandoned his Anglican faith due to the influence of a school mistress who was involved with "Theosophy, Rosicrucianism, Spiritualism; the whole Anglo-American Occultist tradition." And Lewis developed a "lust" for the occult that remained with him even after he returned to Anglicanism. He said,

"And that started in me something with which, on and off, I have had plenty of trouble since--the desire for the preternatural, simply as such, the passion for the Occult. Not everyone has this disease; those who have will know what I mean. I once tried to describe it in a novel. It is a spiritual lust; and like the lust of the body it has the fatal power of making everything else in the world seem uninteresting while it lasts." ("Surprised by Joy," Harcourt Brace, 1955, pages 58-60.)

The moment you mention Matthew 16:27-28 to any preacher or theology expert, the age old tactics of explaining away scriptures starts. That is when CS Lewis made his statement that Jesus was wrong.

You are sidetracking the post and not addressing the question.
It is clear that Lewis writes that the early Christians were wrong, Jesus was ignorant.
Being ignorant (not knowing) is different than being wrong, and Lewis makes his point.

It doesn't matter what Lewis believes, for all I care he believed that baby's are delivered by post.
Your deviation from the topic is an ad hominem, not an argument.

Offline BondServant

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Re: CS Lewis said Jesus was wrong
« Reply #14 on: July 31, 2013, 09:28:14 PM »

 
Lewis wrote another theological book near the end of his brilliant, literary career entitled The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays (1960). In it, he alleges surprisingly, “the first Christians have been proved to be false. It is clear from the New Testament that they all expected the Second Coming in their own lifetime. And, worse still, they had a reason, and one which you will find very embarrassing. Their Master had told them so. He shared, and indeed created, their delusion. He said in so many words, ‘this generation shall not pass till all these things be done.’ And he was wrong. He clearly knew no more about the end of the world than anyone else” (p. 97). So, C. S. Lewis said Jesus “was wrong” about something very important–when he would return.

Do you agree the Jesus was wrong?

Your post is extremely misleading.

C.S. Lewis did NOT say that.  He wrote the essay and in that essay, he was quoting somebody else.  Those words were NOT his.