Author Topic: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?  (Read 16846 times)

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Offline mclees8

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #105 on: Wed Mar 19, 2014 - 13:09:45 »
I am not moved to be Catholic nor do I except the papacy.

Um - do you mean "except" or accept? 

I suspect the latter ......

Sorry Dave I was lousy in English and did not take typing. My grammar is the worst. Please try to over look some of my grammar errors.  You are right I meant accept. I think some look at what is being said more than be grammar critics. Still thank for your correction. Please remember that one of our greatest apostles was an uneducated man.   ::smile::
« Last Edit: Wed Mar 19, 2014 - 13:25:12 by mclees8 »

Offline DaveW

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #106 on: Wed Mar 19, 2014 - 13:28:59 »
No problem.  But my mom was a school teacher and many mistakes just jump out at me.   ::smile::

As to a great apostle being uneducated, that is a relative term.  Peter and most of the rest of the disciples grew up in the synagogue system which was administered by the Pharisees.  Their (Pharisees) level of education would definitely be post-doctorate in our system and by the time a person (who was paying attention) had spent 15 or 20 years in the synagogue they had (by some estimates) the equivalent of a master's degree in theology. "Rabbi" means teacher and many took that job very seriously.  Jewish culture has ALWAYS put a high priority of education.

So the guys with the master's degrees were considered "uneducated."

Offline mclees8

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #107 on: Wed Mar 19, 2014 - 16:47:30 »
No problem.  But my mom was a school teacher and many mistakes just jump out at me.   ::smile::

As to a great apostle being uneducated, that is a relative term.  Peter and most of the rest of the disciples grew up in the synagogue system which was administered by the Pharisees.  Their (Pharisees) level of education would definitely be post-doctorate in our system and by the time a person (who was paying attention) had spent 15 or 20 years in the synagogue they had (by some estimates) the equivalent of a master's degree in theology. "Rabbi" means teacher and many took that job very seriously.  Jewish culture has ALWAYS put a high priority of education.

So the guys with the master's degrees were considered "uneducated."

I can certainly agree with you even  as much to say someone who has years in church and studying of His Bible can gain more practical education than someone who has a masters degree from a theological seminary.

I have gained a wealth of understanding just being in the Catholic board for several years. Having some degree is not any real measure of ones knowledge and understanding of Gods word. I did not mean that Peter was a dumb man by any means. Paul was very educated yet after having come into knowledge of Christ he counted it as garbage. I believe he used the term dung
« Last Edit: Wed Mar 19, 2014 - 16:50:17 by mclees8 »

Offline Ladonia

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #108 on: Thu Mar 20, 2014 - 22:38:27 »
Allow me to clarify, rituals and or traditions that are non-Biblical such as secret handshakes, or extra Biblical literature.





I see. So all those books written by people like T.D. Jakes, Joel Olsteen, Billy Graham, or Bishop Sheen should not be read to gain an insight into God's plan for us?

Have you read any of those books Ladonia? Would you know if they did line up. One really has to know his bible and be born of the spirit to see things that are misleading.  When it comes to Bible I would say Billy Graham is pretty safe. How ever he has been a little to political of late. I have not read the others. There are a lot of dangerous books out there also pushing false doctrines and twisted interpretation.

What do you think about pope Francis? Catholica has posted much of his teaching and insights on the catholic board. He is strong on the Bible and stresses to make it personal in our walk. I must say I agree with that as I believe most Protestants would.

I have only read some books by Bishop Sheen a person who I admire very much. As for the others I have mentioned I am sure that if they write with the spirit of God then some people may gain a better insight  into their belief in Christ and all that he wanted us to know.

As for Pope Francis, I believe that he is a humble man and just the person the church needed after the two previous Popes. While remaining true adherents of the Church,  each of these men have nonetheless brought their unique viewpoint and style to the faithful  and we can learn something from them all.


I have read a few books but not a lot.  I am sure that if those men are led of the spirit they can lend to our knowledge but I know enough of my Bible which is a Life in the  Spirit study Bible that I have come to trust fully to discern truth. I have spent years listening to preachers and studying under teachers. This much I know that we need more than just reading things that sound right, but we must be led of the spirit so we can discern true  biblical doctrine. We do not get this over night, and being led of the spirit is a gift. 

Yes I would say he is the most Bible centered pope I seen even though I am not moved to be Catholic nor do I except the papacy. As long as he speaks true biblical truth as I know that many Protestants also do then I say listen. Relgious and political Babylon are still joined at the hip and deception still works in the world

Most Bible centered Pope? The Mass that each Pope has ever prayed is totally Bible centered and the Catholic Church itself is led by the Holy Spirit. You make the mistake of seeing Pope Francis as somehow "different" than any of his predecessors just because he has another way of communicating to the faithful.

Truth be told my friend, this man Francis is as orthodox a Catholic as there ever was. He believes that the Sacraments are the surest way to live a holy life in union with Jesus Christ and he looks to the Church for the correct interpretation of the Holy Scriptures. From believing in the Church's "Sacred Traditions", to praying the rosary, to believing in purgatory - this man is a faithful Catholic through and through.

So stop trying to graft your idea of who he is, or who you want him to be onto him and accept the reality that he does indeed consider himself to be the "Vicar of Christ" here on earth and that he is just the latest Bishop of Rome in a long line of them all the way back to St. Peter.
« Last Edit: Thu Mar 20, 2014 - 22:46:35 by Ladonia »

Offline mclees8

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #109 on: Fri Mar 21, 2014 - 15:27:06 »
Allow me to clarify, rituals and or traditions that are non-Biblical such as secret handshakes, or extra Biblical literature.





I see. So all those books written by people like T.D. Jakes, Joel Olsteen, Billy Graham, or Bishop Sheen should not be read to gain an insight into God's plan for us?

Have you read any of those books Ladonia? Would you know if they did line up. One really has to know his bible and be born of the spirit to see things that are misleading.  When it comes to Bible I would say Billy Graham is pretty safe. How ever he has been a little to political of late. I have not read the others. There are a lot of dangerous books out there also pushing false doctrines and twisted interpretation.

What do you think about pope Francis? Catholica has posted much of his teaching and insights on the catholic board. He is strong on the Bible and stresses to make it personal in our walk. I must say I agree with that as I believe most Protestants would.

I have only read some books by Bishop Sheen a person who I admire very much. As for the others I have mentioned I am sure that if they write with the spirit of God then some people may gain a better insight  into their belief in Christ and all that he wanted us to know.

As for Pope Francis, I believe that he is a humble man and just the person the church needed after the two previous Popes. While remaining true adherents of the Church,  each of these men have nonetheless brought their unique viewpoint and style to the faithful  and we can learn something from them all.


I have read a few books but not a lot.  I am sure that if those men are led of the spirit they can lend to our knowledge but I know enough of my Bible which is a Life in the  Spirit study Bible that I have come to trust fully to discern truth. I have spent years listening to preachers and studying under teachers. This much I know that we need more than just reading things that sound right, but we must be led of the spirit so we can discern true  biblical doctrine. We do not get this over night, and being led of the spirit is a gift. 

Yes I would say he is the most Bible centered pope I seen even though I am not moved to be Catholic nor do I except the papacy. As long as he speaks true biblical truth as I know that many Protestants also do then I say listen. Relgious and political Babylon are still joined at the hip and deception still works in the world

Most Bible centered Pope? The Mass that each Pope has ever prayed is totally Bible centered and the Catholic Church itself is led by the Holy Spirit. You make the mistake of seeing Pope Francis as somehow "different" than any of his predecessors just because he has another way of communicating to the faithful.

Truth be told my friend, this man Francis is as orthodox a Catholic as there ever was. He believes that the Sacraments are the surest way to live a holy life in union with Jesus Christ and he looks to the Church for the correct interpretation of the Holy Scriptures. From believing in the Church's "Sacred Traditions", to praying the rosary, to believing in purgatory - this man is a faithful Catholic through and through.

So stop trying to graft your idea of who he is, or who you want him to be onto him and accept the reality that he does indeed consider himself to be the "Vicar of Christ" here on earth and that he is just the latest Bishop of Rome in a long line of them all the way back to St. Peter.

I don,t recall  saying he was not orthodox and  faithful to Catholicism in all practice. I am also sure that men kiss his ring and call him holy father, and I use small case because he is not our Father in heaven.   I was just impressed with the fact he taught to make our Bibles personal in our life. Protestants have taught this for years. How ever if Catholics heed his teaching and really embrace the Lords word in fullness they would have to leave the RCC.

  I am sure he has humility even thought the office he holds is full carnal exaltation that Peter would never do or did he in his day. The papacy is stll a Harlot and has not changed or repented of sleeping with the world and its politics.  What do you think  it means when it says " love not the world or the things of it." You also might reread the Lords prayer for the disciples and count the times the world is mentioned. These  things are ignored or explained away. One verse he said should stand out in His prayer John 17:9

I pray for them: ( the disciples) I pray not for the world.

This is the reason why I can never accept the RCC. How ever much of Protestants have loved the world also.
All that is in Babylon will be judged. Rev 18     The papacy and all the grand parade and costume  will burn.
But you can still come out of it while you can yet the Lord shall come as a thief in the night. The Lord will come for his bride while you sleep.
« Last Edit: Fri Mar 21, 2014 - 15:47:49 by mclees8 »

Offline christbearer

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #110 on: Tue Jun 10, 2014 - 19:36:00 »
Hi mclees8 and gang, I just joined today so first off - hello.
I have been until about 4 or 5 years ago a Protestant. And the Bible is exactly what led me to the Catholic church.  It was the only denomination that was able to articulate Biblical answers for all my questions. How many denominations are there? And why? If the holy spirit will lead us to all truth, and I'd as it says in Timothy 3:15 , the church is the pillar and foundation of truth,  then either the Bible is wrong, or God meant we be "perfectly one" in one true church.

I could not continue to protest the Catholic church in light of the word of God as recorded in the Bible. A book I believe to be the infallible word of God.

Offline DaveW

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #111 on: Wed Jun 11, 2014 - 05:38:31 »
Welcome ChristBearer.  (great handle BTW)

I also do not protest the catholic church although I do disagree with many points of doctrine.  My own research on the church led me to Messianic Judaism.

Offline Carey

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #112 on: Wed Jun 11, 2014 - 17:31:27 »
Welcome to Grace Centered Christbearer.

My family is protestant, as am I, but I married into Catholicism, in a Catholic church.  That said, I do disagree with some Catholic doctrine, but some "protestant" doctrine also, I suppose.  I do not consider the Catholic church to be the one true church, the true church is a body of Christians in a relationship with Christ, regardless of denominational preferences.  Together we are one.

I attend services and am a part of the Church of God, Anderson, Indiana.  Although we are about as far from Catholic formalities as a "denomination"  can be we have a very close relationship with the Catholic church next door.  We are blessed by embracing our common purpose and serving one another, as well as the community at large, together.

I am pleased to call a Catholic "brother" hoping this sentiment reciprocal.

Cheers,
Carey.


Offline Alan

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #113 on: Wed Jun 11, 2014 - 18:27:23 »
I was born and baptized catholic, but never knew God until a few years back. I s'pose I could be classified a protestant, but that's just another name dished out by those that were opposed to the opposition  ::giggle::


I have no issue with the catholic Church, even though I don't agree with all of their doctrine, however some Catholics seem to harvest pride and refuse to acknowledge another Brother or Sister in Christ, despite the denominational similarities/differences.


Catholicism is another denomination today, like it or not.

Offline christbearer

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #114 on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 - 12:20:17 »
As a Protestant who studied his way into the Catholic church I can confidently say that many Catholic Christians do not reflect the doctrine of the church accurately,  most converts have a very good understanding. I would suggest if ever a Catholic or any member of a faith community acts or says something confrontational or simply arrogant/pridefull, ask them back it up with Scripture and when appropriate church doctrine.

 The Catholic church teaches all gifts of the spirit (wherever they occur ) are for all gods people and the good of the church.  It also teaches we are all brothers in Christ united by baptism in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

I dispute the idea of either the Catholic or Orthodox being classified as just another denomination,  for 1500 years no other Church existed, save Gnostic  heretic movements.

My experience in a number of Protestant bodies was not only a protesting of Catholic doctrine but also protesting each others doctrine, the Catholic Church has 20 some odd churches in full communion sharing fully a faith but expressed uniquely.


Offline DaveW

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #115 on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 - 12:27:54 »
I dispute the idea of either the Catholic or Orthodox being classified as just another denomination,  for 1500 years no other Church existed, save Gnostic  heretic movements.

And I dispute that the Sect of the Nazoreans should have been dubbed "heretics." They (we) were not gnostic.

Offline Alan

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #116 on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 - 12:29:27 »
I know many more Catholics than other denominations, but none of them are interested in talking about Jesus or the Bible, they think I'm too serious about all this "stuff".

Offline DaveW

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #117 on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 - 12:36:27 »
I know many more Catholics than other denominations, but none of them are interested in talking about Jesus or the Bible, they think I'm too serious about all this "stuff".

There are true Christians who are Catholic and there are cultural Catholics.

Sounds like you have run into the latter.

Offline Alan

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #118 on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 - 12:42:07 »
I know many more Catholics than other denominations, but none of them are interested in talking about Jesus or the Bible, they think I'm too serious about all this "stuff".

There are true Christians who are Catholic and there are cultural Catholics.

Sounds like you have run into the latter.


Correct, and by Catholic by ethnicity and family tradition, went to Catholic school and now attend Church on Sundays.


I'd never met any sold out for Christ Catholics until coming here, which a few certainly are faithful followers of Christ.

Offline DaveW

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #119 on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 - 13:13:01 »
I have known many, over several decades. Many were in the charismatic renewal, but not all.


I have known the others as well.

Offline christbearer

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Re: What constitutes someone being a "Protestant"?
« Reply #120 on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 - 14:02:50 »
You will encounter more "cultural " Catholic folks than anyone else just due to shear numbers of Catholics,  this is as much a failing of their parents and if the did grow up actually attending a parish regularly, the clergy and others who minster to them. I am blessed with a parish family that is more passionate and has a deeper knowledge of Bible, history and traditional than at any of the Protestant churches I ever attended.

It is all of our responsibilities as Christians to seek truth in an open and unbiased way.

I for one never make a theological judgment without reading discussing and considering the different veiwpoints from the source, as opposed to just one sided responses or apologetic works.

Heresy, from the Greek αίρέσίς, hairesis, denotin doctrinal belief held in opposition to the recogniz Theologically it means an opinion at variance with when this promotes separation from the main body of faithful believers