Author Topic: Down's  (Read 1713 times)

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Offline RED SHIFT1

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Down's
« on: Sun Dec 20, 2009 - 19:14:53 »
My boy has Down's; he is 11.  We have not had a lot of luck potty training him.  He will urinate in the toliet usually...but he just does not have many bowel movements in the potty.  He is better now that say 5 five years ago, tho.  I think the main reason is that he just gets interested in playing or whatever and just ignores the urge.

We dress him with regular underwear, cause he rarely seems to have an accident at school...it just seems to start when he gets home.  Any ideas?

son of God

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Re: Down's
« Reply #1 on: Sun Dec 20, 2009 - 21:18:12 »
My boy has Down's; he is 11.  We have not had a lot of luck potty training him.  He will urinate in the toliet usually...but he just does not have many bowel movements in the potty.  He is better now that say 5 five years ago, tho.  I think the main reason is that he just gets interested in playing or whatever and just ignores the urge.

We dress him with regular underwear, cause he rarely seems to have an accident at school...it just seems to start when he gets home.  Any ideas?

We have a 9 year-old boy with downs.  It's an emotional thing, predominantly, from what I see.  Even "normal" kids do the same thing to varying degrees.  The harsher the "trauma", the worse the condition, often.  I was molested as a kid, and caged for sex, and had problems controlling myself until I was 13.  Both #1 and 2.  We the bed until 14ish?  Tried everything.  None of it worked.  But then God did a work in my heart, and viola! --- all the problems were instantly gone.  Interesting, isn't it?  I've also worked with kids and adults with disabilities, and kids and adult downies, too, before I got married and had my own kids.

I say that Downies are like a box of chocolates: you don't know what you have until they "open up" --- ie, develope into who/what they are like as a person.  Each is unique.  Yes, this is true of all, but regarding those with special needs, this truth tends to be amplified and much more readily seen.

Hang in there!

We have found that strong, strong discipline, coupled with incredible amounts of love and affection is what does the trick for our son.  I didn't know I had that much to give in either of those things until we had him.  Sometimes I think that God gave him to us just to let us know that parenting isn't always such an easy thing.  With our other 5 kids, it's been a cake walk: no problems, issues, or whatever.  But not with our downy!

I have learned much about spiritual things via God using him in me.  Wouldn't trade it for the world, but sometimes yes, I do long for a "normal" child.

Blessings on your and yours!

PS
As we know, the emotional state of a person directly affects their body.  Nervous?  Sweaty, wet hands and scalp.  Angry?  Temperature actually rises.  Blood even comes to the surface.  And blood pressure rises.  Scared?  Noticable symptoms there, too.  With those who have handicaps/disabilities, the inter-relation is much more pronounced and easily stimulated.  Food for thought.